Introduction to Shutter Speed in Digital Photography

This article is not mine, but definitely worth reading. You who know my work know that I’ve written a book on photometry,Photometric simple – You in the control of light, where on board, in addition to other concepts for a good exposure, Aperture, and ISO speed.

I’ve discussed so well here on the site the ISOparameter, which also indicate the reading because he also is an essential parameter for who is starting.

I think it’s constructive to vision of other photographers on the same subject, so I translated the article from the American photographer Darren Rowse, I hope you like it and that is very useful.

Introduction to shutter speed in Digital photography

Previously I introduced the concept of the Triangle of exposure as a way of thinking about getting out of automatic mode and explore the idea of manually adjust the exposure of your photos.

According to photionary, the three main parameters that you can adjust are the ISO, aperture and shutter speed. I reviewed and made previously to the ISO settings and now I want to draw attention to the shutter speed.

What is shutter speed?

As I wrote earlier, set basically-the shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter stays open.

In film photography, this was the amount of time in which the film was exposed to the scene you were photographing and similarly, in digital photography the shutter speed is the amount of time that your image sensor ‘ sees ‘ that you are trying to capture.

Let me try to split the topic of “shutter speed” in some small pieces that should help digital cameras photographers understand the shutter speed:

  • Shutter speed is measured in seconds– or, in most cases, fractional seconds. The higher the speed, the bigger the denominator (i.e. 1/1000 is much faster than 1/30).
  • In most cases you will probably be using shutter speeds of 1/60 of a second or more. This is because any slower speed than that is very difficult to use without shaking the camera. Camera shake is when your camera moves while the shutter is open and results in a blur in your photos.
  • If you are using a lower shutter speed (anything less than 1/60), you will probably need to use a tripod or some kind of image stabilization (more and more cameras are coming with this embedded).
  • The shutter speeds available to you in your camera will usually fold (approximately) with each setting.As a result, you usually will have the options to the following shutter speeds-1/500, 1/250, 1/125, 1/60, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8, etc. This ‘ Warp ‘ is useful to remember that opening settings also double the amount of light that enters-as a result increase the shutter speed at a stop and slow down the opening at a stop must provide similar exhibition levels. You can study more about f-stop here.
  • Some cameras also provide the option of very low shutter speeds, which are not fractional seconds and Yes seconds (for example, 1 second, 10 seconds, 30 seconds, etc.). These are used in situations with very little light, when you’re behind special effects and/or when you are trying to capture a lot of movement in a picture. Some cameras also provide you the option to shoot in ‘ B ‘ (or ‘ Bulb ‘). The bulb mode lets you keep the shutter open until you shoot (always with a self-timer) and close the shutter. Widely used in Light PaintingFireworksand Photo of beams of light.
  • When you are considering which shutter speed to use on an image, you should always ask yourself if something in your scene is moving and how you would like to capture this movement. If there is a movement in your scene, you have the choice to freeze movement (so it appears stationary) or leave the object in motion blur intentionally (giving a sense of movement).
  • To freeze the movement in an image(as in the photos of the birds above and the surfer below) you should choose a faster shutter speed and to let the motion blur, you should choose a lower shutter speed. The real speed you choose will vary depending on the speed of the target in your picture and how you want it to be blurred.

The image of the bird above the shutter speed was 1/1250 of a second, which means that despite the bird beat its wings rapidly, they seem to be frozen in a fraction of a second. Surf photo below had a shutter speed of 1/4000 second, capturing even the drops precisely.

  • Movement is not always bad.I talked to a photographer last week who told me that he always wore high shutter speeds and couldn’t understand why anyone would want to move in your images. There are times when the movement is good. For example, when you’re taking a photo of a waterfall or the sea and wants to show how fast the water is flowing, or when you are taking a picture of a race car and you want to give a sense of speed, or when you are taking picture the stars and wants to show how the stars move over a long period of time. In all these cases, choose a lower shutter speed will be the best way to do that. However, in all these cases you need to use a tripod or you run the risk of ruining the photos by adding camera movement (a different kind of blur).

For example in the following, the shutter speed was 1/3 of a second, so we see the movement of water.

  • In the photo of the subway below, the shutter speed was 1 second, then the movement of trains on both sides of the target is beautifully blurred.

 

Focal length and shutter speed – another thing to consider when choosing the shutter speed is the focal length of the lens you are using. Higher focal lengths will accentuate the amount of movement of the camera you have, then you will need to choose a longer shutter speed (unless you have image stabilization in your lens or camera). The general rule for use with the focal length in situations without image stabilizer is to choose a shutter speed with a denominator greater than the focal length of the lens. For example, if you have a lens that is 50 mm, 1/60 are probably okay, but if you have a 200 mm lens, you should probably shoot around 1/250.

Shutter speed – in short

Remember to think of shutter speed without considering the other two elements of the triangle of exposure (aperture and ISO) is not a good idea. As you change the shutter speed, you will need to change one or both of the other parameters to compensate.

For example, if you speed up the shutter speed at a stop light (for example from 1/125 to 1/250) you’re pretty much leaving half of the amount of light entering your camera. To compensate, you probably need to increase your opening at a stop light (for example from f16 to f11). The other alternative would be to choose a higher ISO (you can change ISO 100 to ISO 400, for example).

Soon I’ll discuss the last element of the triangle of exposure – opening.

I made the changes and additions that I thought necessary, and I hope this article was more of a stepping stone for your photographic journey!

See you soon!

Gallery

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Source: digital-photography-school.com

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Source: digital-photography-school.com

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Source: digital-photography-school.com

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Introduction to Shutter Speed

Source: digital-photography-school.com

Introduction to Shutter Speed in Digital Photography

Introduction to Shutter Speed in Digital Photography

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Introduction to Shutter Speed

Introduction to Shutter Speed

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Shutter Speed - KHS

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Slow-Shutter-Speed-1

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Introduction to Shutter Speed: Easy explanation and examples

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Introduction to Shutter Speed in Landscape Photography ...

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Shutter Speeds - Introduction

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Introduction to Shutter Speed in Landscape Photography …

Introduction to Shutter Speed in Landscape Photography ...

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Understanding Shutter Speed for Beginners

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Camera Shutter Speeds explained

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Introduction of Shutter Speed

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Introduction to Slow Shutter Speed Photography: Embrace ...

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Tips for Using Shutter Speed Creatively

Tips for Using Shutter Speed Creatively

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Amazon.com: Mastering Camera Shutter Speed: Digital …

Amazon.com: Mastering Camera Shutter Speed: Digital ...

Source: www.amazon.com

Amanda’s Pictures: Slow Shutter Speed Photography

Amanda's Pictures: Slow Shutter Speed Photography

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The Three Basics of Photography – Light And Matter

The Three Basics of Photography – Light And Matter

Source: www.lightandmatter.org

17strevdav

17strevdav

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A brief introduction to Photography

A brief introduction to Photography

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Photography 101: Introduction to shutter speed ...

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Understanding Shutter Speed in Photography

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ISO, Aperture & Shutter Speed

ISO, Aperture & Shutter Speed

Source: greymurmurs.wordpress.com

Intro to the DSLR Camera – Keller’s Blog Site

Intro to the DSLR Camera – Keller's Blog Site

Source: blogs.vsb.bc.ca

Out of this world: Introduction to shutter speed

Out of this world: Introduction to shutter speed

Source: crackpotidea.blogspot.com

Digital Photography | Camera

Digital Photography | Camera

Source: www.scribd.com

ISO Settings in Digital Photography

ISO Settings in Digital Photography

Source: digital-photography-school.com

Best 20+ Photography terms ideas on Pinterest

Best 20+ Photography terms ideas on Pinterest

Source: www.pinterest.com